This article was originally published on Louder Than War on 26 January 2013.

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Hector really are a brand new band having released their first tracks on the world this week. They are mixing up a ’50s rock ‘n’ roll sound with Arctic Monkey style words and vocals and it’s well worth a listen.

Hector seem to have come out of nowhere. It seemed the name, the existence of this band, had only just started being passed around when there was a collection of songs released and news their first two gigs would be in support of Turin Brakes.

A duo, guitars and vocals come from James Capper, who’s also lead singer with The Iron Door Club. They’ve lurched into public consciousness with a collection of songs drawing wonderfully on ’50s rock ‘n’ roll. Songs about love voiced in the style of Alex Turner, a regional accent touching the edges of the love-fuelled lyrics.

They move effortlessly through the sound of decades past, a classic RnB soulful sound with a bubbling jangle of guitars and the tightest, sharpest drum beats. It says as much for the production of these early songs as the creativity and maturity of the composition.

The wonderful Left Behind, the stand out track from a strong set, is soaring heart-on-sleeve brilliance that will appeal to lager-swilling Lads as much as self-aware hipster types. A beautiful lyric, lovely vocal and spot on performance – could you really ask for more, especially from a band this newly born?

Elsewhere there is racing Cajun rhythms and drawled vocals that bring to mind Chuck Berry. It all makes you want to move your feet and feel the energy of this band live.

These are songs that could be thrashed out in the sweaty back room of a tiny venue as much as you imagine them booming through the void of an arena. They’re not there yet, but they could be. There’s much potential, and in that could-be-should-be anthemic possibility is exactly the sort of tingling excitement rock ‘n’ roll should bring.

You can hear more songs on the band’s Soundcloud or follow them on Twitter @hectorband

All words by Sarah Lay.